“Long Shot”: How Major League Baseball and some silly reality TV prevent a wrongful conviction

Long Shot” (2017), a “long short” (39 min) by Jacob LaMendola, tells the story about how a wrongful conviction was prevented, using baseball and reality television, in 2003.

In August, 2003, Juan Catalan was suddenly arrested by LAPD for the drive-by shooting of a 16 year old girl not too far from Dodger Stadium. A witness identified him from a police sketch but could only have seen him in dim light. Yet witness ID-ing often creates probable cause and can sometimes support convictions.

But Juan maintained he was at a baseball game in Dodger Stadium, where the Atlanta Braves scored seven runs in the top of the ninth to win 11-4.  Because the visiting team was mounting the long tie-breaking rally, no walk-off win ending the game suddenly could occur. Some of the telecast is shown in the film. The length of the rally may have helped Juan, as it prolonged the footage of an HBO reality show “Curb Your Enthusiasm” gave defense attorneys a change to find him in the stands very shortly before the shooting.

The HBo episode involved a hooker’s stopping somone in the carpool lane of an LA Freeway when the ordinary lanes were blocked.

Prosecutors try hard to cling to their eyewitness theory until the end.

Wikipedia attribution link for Dodger Stadium picture.

I was an extra in a filming of a scene for WB’s “Major League 3” in November 1997, held at the Minneapolis Metrodome, now torn down and replaced by Target Field.  I got to hold up my “Do Ask Do Tell” book cover and a shot of it lasting ¼ second or so may have gotten into the film.  They fed us hotdog dinners.

The picture above is mine from a 2012 trip, actually in San Diego.

Name:  “Long Shot”
Director, writer:  Jacob LaMendola
Released:  2017
Format:  1.85:1
When and how viewed: Netflix instant play, 2017/10/10
Length:  39
Rating:  NA
Companies:  Netflix
Link:  official (subscription)

(Posted: Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017 at 7 PM EDT)

“17 Misconceptions about the Effects of Electromagnetic Pulse”: half-hour film seems the best explanation of the real threat to ordinary Americans so far

 

I usually review “YouTube” films on my legacy blogs on Blogger, and the following 25mnute video by “Reality Survival” would normally go on my “Films on Major Threats to Freedom” blog. But I thought that this particular technical explanation of the electromagnetic pulse (EMP) threat so cogent as to need to be brought over here as a significant longer short film that ought to be offered in festivals.

It is titled “17 Misconceptions about the Effects of an Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP)” by Reality Survival

He (the presenter) does not list his point, so I trust that his strike count is 17.

He starts out by pointing out that a high altitude nuclear blast from a thermonuclear weapon (hydrogen bomb) who have a “source area” below where the effects are severe, and a “tangent” area surrounding it where they are much less severe.

The most widely touted damage is the “E3” phase, or third phase, lasting perhaps a minute, where Earth’s magnetic field around the event is severely disturbed.  This is the phase that overloads transformers and knocks out the power grids (there are three in the U,S.)  He says there are about 370 major transformers in the United States that are too large for conventional transportation and have to be built in situ.  It could take two to three years to rebuild them all.  That presumes that the components could still be manufactured in other parts of the world and shipped.  But he says that a solar storm that was severe enough (larger than Carrington in 1857) could envelop the Earth even on the night side and prevent any remanufacturing anywhere, so that rebuilding would take maybe 10 years.  We may have had a close call with a huge coronal mass ejection in late July 2012.  So from the power grid perspective, the solar storm risk may be greater than what is posed by North Korea (although Russia and China are capable of wiping out civilization for good, as are we).

But the EMP from a nuclear blast has two other components, E1 and E2, where it is much easier to provide some protection. Furthermore, (at least according to Resilient Societies) fission nuclear weapons produce only these first two effects (a fact touted by “EMP deniers”).  That is one reason why North Korea’s claim to have a hydrogen bomb is strategically significant.

The HEMP E1 is a fast pulse that destroys magnetic data and personal electronics.  These devices might be protected by “nested Faraday cages”.  He notes that solid state electronics (like thumb drives) can be destroyed by E1 even though they are not ordinary harmed by household magnets or ordinary magnetic fluctuations in the environment (like by nearby transmission towers).  He recommends people back up their data on optical data, like single-sided CD’s.  Automobile ignition systems are often touted as vulnerable (as in the book “One Second After”).  He says that most cars made before 2003 would probably run, and some newer cars still have the proper shielding.  He says that sometimes a car will start if the battery is disconnected and then reconnected.  But of course you would run out of gas eventually, and electrical charging stations presumably would not work.

The speaker hints that old-fashioned electronics of early stereo and HiFi enthusiasts in the 1960s might work (when I was collecting classical phonograph records) but some vacuum tube components could be undermined by “selenium rectifiers”.

The E2 pulse is more like what a lightning strike to an existing power line does.  Your surge protectors may actually shield from these.  The E2 pulse is the easiest to deflect.

It’s noteworthy that the E3 pulse (like from solar storms) does not normally threaten personal electronics.

James Woolsey, as noted before, has warned that North Korea could launch an EMP attack (possibly in retaliation if Trump strikes the DPRK mainland) from one of its “Shining Star” satellites.  But it does not appear that it would have a thermonuclear weapon on one of these satellites, but it might be capable of an E1 strike.  So consumers need to back up their data on optical data now, even this week?  Remember, an E1-only strike would wipe out devices without wiping out the power grid, apparently.  As a purely geopolitical matter, I note that some other videos on YouTube suggest that China could actually goad North Korea into a high-altitude thermonuclear E3 EMP strike over the US so that China could then conquer the US.  The Domino Theory is back.

There is no information that I am aware of as to whether big cloud companies (Google, Apple, etc) have physical protection of their data with faraday-like covers.

It’s also possible for non-nuclear magnetic flux devices deployed by terrorists in local areas.  It is not clear which effects they have, but they might mainly be E1 and E2.  This was covered by a now largely forgotten Popular Mechanics issue around Labor Day of 2001, one week before 9/11.   The Washington Times wrote about this in 2009.  The US Army uses these devices in Afghanistan now, and one is on display in the Ordnance Museum in Aberdeen, MD.

All of this suggests an enhanced kind of cultural hygiene that we have already gotten used to in meeting cyber threats and hackers (particularly, recently, ransomware as well as doxing and release of PII).  Protection of personal data with optical devices or with Faraday cages could become part of the culture that people need to learn to deal with.  I plan a visit to Best Buy soon to discuss this with Geek Squad.  But that seems applicable only against one kind of threat: older fission nuclear weapons.

The larger point is that society has become much more technology dependent than it was, again, say in the 1960s, the time of the last Cuban Missile Crisis.  While the Pentagon seems to have protected its own systems, protection of consumer and commercial use of technology seems to have lagged behind the serious threats.

It’s noteworthy that “Resilient Societies” has claimed on Twitter that the power grids could be protected with an investment by the utility industry of about $5 per consumer (about $2 billion nationwide), but I can’t yet find any statement as to what the technology at the transformer protection level would be.  However, many utilities (Dominion Power in Virginia for example) have recently announced unspecified security enhancements to their grids against both cyberterror and direct physical threats.

That’s one reason why the “doomsday prepper” and survivalist crowd has developed its somewhat extreme vision of personal morality (that we sometimes associated with the alt-right):  that everyone needs to learn to deal with the immediate physical world and participate in a familial social hierarchy to protect others before seeking global fame through modern civilized living.

The Wikipedia article on nuclear EMP is here.  Note the 2013 bill proposed in the House.

This article by Motoko Rich and David E Sanger about the geopolitical strategy is quite chilling. The Domino Theory of the Vietnam ear draft (my DADT I book) is indeed back.

I have to ask, also, where is the mainstream media on this?  It’s hardly ver mentioned.  But Newt Gingrich and others have testified about this threat before Congress as recently as March of this year. It’s not just North Korea, it’s also space climate (which doesn’t change.)

(Posted: Monday, September 4, 2017, at 10:30 AM EDT)

Update: Sept. 5

The filmmaker has sent me the link of his followup:
How to Build a Nested Faraday Cage: Protect Your Electronics from an EMP

(28 Minutes)

“The Messengers”: Volunteers serve homeless men with HIV at a house in Washington DC

The Messengers“, directed by Lucian Perkins, shows us the life of two committed volunteers at Joseph’s House, a hospice for homeless men with HIV and AIDS, in Washington DC, in Adams-Morgan.  The film showed at Filmfest DC on Sunday afternoon at Landmark E Street.

One young woman comes up for a year of service from North Carolina before finishing college, but now she has finished her Masters in social work at Columbia.

The film also traces the experiences of some of the patients, such as one who was told he had only two months to live but survived ten.  At one point Elijah actually looks forward to the possibility of his own place again, as sometimes people get better and can live on their own.  The experience here is more variable than at large “commercial” hospices where people die of old age and usually enter only when they have a few days to live. But this house is very much a home for the patients as is.

Emotionally the experience is very intense, with volunteers sitting with patients for very long periods. During the QA, it was said that the House only accepts volunteers who can make extensive minimum time commitments.  This is not an experience that benefits from large numbers for short times.

The film showed a cat and dog, and one wonders how well they understand what is happening.

In understanding the title of the film, it is well to remember that angels are messengers.

QA

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3 Comment that only long-term volunteers are needed

Name: “The Messengers”
Director, writer:  Lucian Perkins
Released:  2017
Format:  digital video
When and how viewed:  Filmfest DC, Landmark E Street, 2017/4/23, large auditorium nearly sold out
Length:  52
Rating:  NA
Companies:  NA  (hope to see on PBS Independent Lens?)
Link:  Facebook, Filmfest DC

(Posted: Sunday, April 23, 2017 at 11:45 PM EDT)

“Logan” does his Run, in a comics film that, after the fact, pans the alt-right

After reading the (libertarian) Foundation for Economic Education op-ed “’Logan’ eviscerates War and Demographic Planning” by Dan Sanchez, I “gave in” and saw a late show of the Marvel film last night. Yes, even Anderson Cooper like the “X-men” franchise.

Sanchez summarizes the plot pretty well, and I’m not sure all of his parallels hold.  But it’s true, that the “corporate state” (Transigen) had created the mutants as weapons and now regards them as threats the way the all-right views both Hispanic and Muslim migrants.

Hugh Jackman(now 48) looks grizzled, and maybe ready to return from exile or retirement.  The plot of this 135-minute bash concerns Logan’s road trip to rescue his 12-year-old daughter Laura (Dafne Keen) with Wolverine-like powers.

Structurally, the film is a bit like my “Tribunal and Rapture” manuscript, a long road trip (finally leading to planetary evacuation on a spaceship) by a retired FBI agent, who finds he has some subtle powers of his own – I finally decided that this sort of story works better for me when told through the eyes of the younger heroes, whose “powers” aren’t usually obvious and whose appearance is wholesome (even if that idea betrays my own erotic prejudices).

The film journeys into Oklahoma, then sidetracks to Reno (I wanted to see Taylor Wilson make a cameo and pitch his plans to save the power grids), before getting to North Dakota, with some scenery that resembles the Teddy Roosevelt badlands – but actually a lot of the film is shot in New Mexico, with mountains in the background.  The mixture of old and new technologies is interesting (like the winch and pulley in the North Dakota scene.  The mutants, by blowing liquid nitrogen breath, can freeze opponents’ limbs and break then off.  So heads, arms and legs roll in this film. (In Dallas, Joe Bob would have said “check it out.”)

To appreciate the film, you have to know some of the pre-history, of characters like Trask, with their pre-occupation with the alt-right notion of “demographic winter” and the idea that “majority” people don’t have enough kids now.  (That’s why Vladimir Putin allows the persecution of gays.)  I’m reminded of Representative Steve King’s (T-IA) doubled-down comments that “we can’t restore our civilization with somebody else’s babies” (story).

Patrick Stewart seems to impersonate me (as he usually does) as Charles, and Boyd Holbrook is notable as Pierce.

I’m reminded of another escapist adventure, “Logan’s Run” (1976), set around the Zale Building on Stemmons Freeway in Dallas, a building in which I worked in the 1980s, where you wonder how the twenty year-olds know think they can eliminate the thirties without facing the same fate themselves soon.

I guess that “Logan”, directed by James Mangold with story by him, was largely developed before Donald Trump won the election, but it seems well conceived as a response to the growing appearance of the alt-right during the 2016 campaigns.  The distributor, Fox, is probably closer to Ayn Rand-style conservatism.

The show opens with a “short film” (“Deadpool: No Good Deed“) about a Logan-like man challenged by a nearby mugging and a telephone booth, in the City.  I’m reminded of Joel Schulmacher’s “Phone Booth” (2002), and even of Timo Descamps and his “Phone Call” or even “Like It Rough” videos.  the 20 Century Fix fanfare then follows, along with TSG and Marvel, before the “feature” starts.  This sort of reminds me also of Dimension Films’s “Grindhouse” in 2007 (embedded double feature and connecting short).  The two short stories in my “Do Ask Do Tell III” book (2014) could be presented this way in film.

Name:  “Logan
Director, writer: James Mangold
Released:  2017
Format:  2.35:1 and Imax
When and how viewed:  2017/3/14 Regal Ballston Quarter, late, low crowd after snowstorm
Length:  137 including short
Rating:  R
Companies:  20th Century Fox, Marvel, TSG
Link:  official

(Posted: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 at 11 AM)

Oscar nominated documentary shorts for 2017: 3 of the films deal with refugees

The Oscar Nominated Documentary Shorts is playing right now at Landmark West End Cinema in Washington D.C. I attended the 1:30 PM showing and it’s a good thing I bought the ticket online because it sold out. The theater has installed rocking chairs, so seating capacity is lower.

The presentation started with “Joe’s Violin” (directed Kahane Cooperman, 24 minutes). The film is a biography of 91-year-old Holocaust survivor Joseph Feingold. When he is 8, his family is moved to western Poland as the Nazis invade. He managed to “escape” with the Russians but some other family members went to Nazi camps and did not survive. But, at 17, after World War II, he was taken to one of Stalin’s labor camps after leaving his violin behind. Somehow he was able to buy the violin back for cigarettes. Years later he donated it to a school for girls in the Bronx, NY. A student named Brianna Perez would be able to play it. The film shows her playing Solveig’s song from Grieg’s Pier Gynt. But somehow the film title and subject matter remind me of John Madden’s “Captain Corelli’s Mandolin” (2001).

“Extremis” was reviewed here Sept. 17, 2016.

4.1 Miles” (directed by Daphne Matziaraki, 24 minutes, New York Times Op-Doc) follows Greek Coast Guard captain Kyriakos Papadopoulos as he rescues refugees fleeing Turkey for the island of Lesbos (for which lesbianism is named) in a vessel that shipwrecks. He says he has no training in CPR. Once the refugees land, the townspeople have no practical choice but to take care of and house them.

There was an intermission before the remaining two films, dealing with Aleppo.

Watani: My Homeland” (directed by Marcel Mettelsiefen, 39 minutes) seems to be almost the same film as “Children of Syria” shown on PBS in April 2016 and reviewed here on a legacy blog. I’ll note that the children mention that their new town Goslar is losing population due to not enough kids and too many old people.

“White Helmets” was reviewed here Oct. 6, 2016

(Posted: Sunday, February 12, 2017 at 9 PM EST)

Oscar nominations for 2017, short films, live action: focus on social solidarity, also on immigration in 2 films

The Oscar nominated short films “live action” did tend to emphasize social solidarity and generosity.  I saw the program at Landmark E Street in Washington DC (as distributed by Magnolia Pictures).

Sing” (no connection to the animated feature) or “Mindenki” (Hungary, directed and written by Kristof Deak and Anna Udvardy, 25 minutes) centers around a children’s choir intending to tour the world. Young Zsofi (Dorka Gasparfalvi) is pulled aside by the teacher Miss Erika (Zsofia Szamosi) and asked to mime in concerts because her singing just isn’t good enough.  Now, many people who are talented in instruments (like piano) don’ t have good singing voices. But Zsofi shares her shame in whispers.  Eventually, at a big concert, the kids show solidarity (at personal risk for their own futures) by miming, to keep some kids from being excluded.  It turns out well, but what if it hadn’t.  Radical solidarity matters most when it costs you something.

Silent Nights” (Denmark, by Aske Bang, 30 minutes) is the meatiest film of the set, exploring the quandaries of helping and even hosting refugees.  Inger (Marlene Beltoft Olsen) takes care of her mother (with dementia and incontinence) at home and still volunteers in a Copenhagen homeless shelter, many of whose clients are migrants from Africa and the Middle East.  Kwame (Prince Yaw A[[iah), from Ghana, after being turned out in the cold when the shelter is full, returns.  The film shows Kwame making cell calls home, talking to his family needing money sent for grandfather’s operation, but Kwame needs a job first.  When Kwame gets assaulted and robbed by some Middle Eastern men uttering racist and Islamist slurs, Inger takes an interest in him.  She maintains that interest even after Kwame gets caught with petty theft from the shelter (to find money to send home) on security cameras.  They fall in love, and eventually Inger proposes marriage so he can stay.  But then she learns he is already married with kids in Ghana.  This film needed to be a feature, as the shift in attitudes by Inger are too choppy to be credible.  But the film makes you think about the risks involved in helping refugees and asylum seekers.

Timecode” (Spain, 15 min., by Juanjo Gimenez Pena”) is a comedy set in a Madrid parking garage, where attendants find excuses to practice their dance moves (almost break dancing), reminding me of “Napoleon Dynamite” (2004).

Enemies Within” (France, 27 min., “Ennemis Interieurs”, by Selim Azzazi), presents an immigration interrogation, or “extreme vetting” (as per Donald Trump, who will like this film) by a young security officer in the 1990s of an Algerian national trying to move back to France.  The history of “The Battle of Algiers” gets reviewed.  The point that Algeria used to be part of the actual land mass of France is well made.  Nevertheless, the young officer starts to find evidence of possible terror associations.  In the end, this turns out to be an exercise of “naming names”.  But of course people already in the country (like people with overstayed visas in the US) can complicate the security threats.

La femme et le TGV” (Switzerland, 30 min, by Timo von Gunten) is a substantial comedy.  A lonely woman Elise (Jane Birkin), who runs a chocolate shop (like the film “Chocolat”) lives near a high-speed rail line (the TGV)  In an inversion of the plot of “The Girl on the Train”, she keeps finding handwritten notes in her yard from Bruno (Gilles Tschudi) the train engineer, who waves. She is stuck and time and says she will never “send an Internet”.   In the meantime, a somewhat charismatic and attractive young man (Nicolas Heini) offers to help her modernize her business.  When the train route changes, the young man takes her to meet Bruno in Zurich.  This is supposed to be a true story, about modernization.  There is a twist.

Wikipedia link for panorama of Copenhagen which I visited in 1972.

(Posted: Friday, February 10, 2017 at 9:45 PM EST)

“The White Helmets”: civilian men who rescue victims of violence in Syria

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Name: The White Helmets
Director, writer:  Orlando Van Eisendel
Released:  2016
Format:  HD video
When and how viewed:  Netflix instant
Length 41
Rating N/a
Companies: Grain media, Violet films
Link: organization 

Remember recently when Libertarian Party presidential candidate Gary Johnson asked a news interviewer, “and what is Aleppo?”  I guess if you take care of your own at home, you don’t need to watch the outside world.

In the “long short” featurette, “The White Helmets”, filmmaker Orlando von Einsiedel (Germany?) becomes inside man to a group, organized in 2013, of about 2900 volunteers, organized into 130 units, who rescue civilians from bombings and devastation in Syria, especially Aleppo.  So far 130 volunteers have given their lives, and saved 58000 lives.

The film focuses especially in interviewing three young men, Khalad Farah, Mohammed Farahm and Abu Omar.  There is one scene where a baby is rescued from rubble.  One of the men says the baby, one week old, is like his own son, two weeks old.  Later he says, “Life requires sacrifice.”

The men go on the road to southern Turkey for basic training, where instructor Read Saleh is interviewed.

Religious ideology is never mentioned.  But the young men seem to be living up to the commandments of the Koran for charity in its more reasonable and moderate interpretations.

There are horrifying reports specifically about the effects of Russian bombing on civilians in Aleppo, as in the Mail or the Guardian.  Putin’s policies may have killed more civilians than ISIS.

Wikipedia attribution link for picture of civilian evacuation in Aleppo, p.d.

Update: Dec. 18, 2016

CBS 60 Minutes presented a segment “The White Helmets: Fighting for Life in Syria’s Vicious Civil War“. The volunteers themselves become targets in Assad’s “double taps” and have wound up as amputees. The story (also subtitled “Hope in a Hopeless Place“) by Brit McCandless is here.

(Published: Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016 at 1:30 PM EDT)

“Extremis”, end-of-life care; “Conflict”, photographers explain their calling in filming war

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Today, two more major documentaries on Netflix.

Extremis”, by Dan Krauss, 24 minutes, f/8 filmworks, records in real time the agonizing end-of-life decisions for several patients at end of life (I think in Chicago).  One is a homeless man, and two are African-American women surrounded by family, and one is a 38-year-old white woman.

The film is shot in Highland Hospital (Rochester, NY). It starts with a doctor trying to get a patient to write down what bothers her because she can’t talk over intubation. As the film progresses, the cases involve whether to keep patients intubated with breathing tubes.  Patients might linger for six months, into a vegetative state, or might live a day or two breathing on their own with family around them (in two cases).

Capital Hospice writes that it is important for family members to stay at the bedside of loved ones even when they are unconscious while passing away naturally.  There is more indirect evidence than ever that the soul gradually stays around before merging into an afterlife.  I’m not sure I could say I complied with that.

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Conflict” (35 min, Ridflix), directed by Nick Fitzhugh, seems to be a “mini-mini-series” of reports from six conflict journalists about their work.   There is some interchangeability between the concept of “journalist” and “photographer”.

The strongest statement may come from Peter Moeller, who goes first, reporting from South Sudan.  Moeller says it is ironic that one the world’s youngest nations has the same hyperindividualistic position on self-defense (and “take care of your own first”) as the world’s leading democracy.  He says he is a conflict photographer and not a combat journalist for its own sake. He says that journalism should be service, and should be personal.  His message to his subject is “let me represent you.”  That sounds like something said in a sermon by youth at a local Presbyterian church here in northern Virginia back in 2012, almost the same speech.  (That church actually has an indirect ministry in that country.)  He also says that war is quiet, that it slowly eats lives away.

The next journalist is Jiao Silva, from South Africa, who reports first on the post-Apartheid violence in Johannesberg  (“Jo-berg”) and then from Kandahar in Afghanistan.  If I follow right, he is the person who loses both legs in combat and walks out in the last scene, long pants, on prosthetics.

The next journalist, Donna Ferrato, reports on domestic violence from New York City.  She gets into situations where she needs to intervene physically.  She encounters husbands who think they “own” their wives.  So some of the rest of us think we’re better than that.

There follows Nicole Tung, who, based in NYC, travels to Syria and crosses illegally from Turkey.  She loses two male reporter friends, the second of whom is beheaded publicly by ISIS.

Robin Hammond reports on the internal violence in the Congo, which, as Anthony Bourdain had explained in a CNN “Parts Unknown”, is indirectly a result of colonialism.  He notes the unfairness of life, and says “ignorance is not an alibi for inaction”, a aphorism that motivates his work.  He thinks he really makes a difference.

But Eros Hoagland, reporting from Mexico and Central America, sees his own profession as a bit of a spectator sport, that could get him killed.  He says, “we fear wolves because we never see them.” True, he rails against corruption in Central America as the reason why drug cartels run the countries.  But he says, if you want to help people, become a doctor and go overseas to poor countries.  I’m reminded of the doctors (and even one journalist) who got Ebola in Liberia and fortunately all recovered with intensive care back in the US or in Britain.

YouTube  preview link is here but disables embedding.

Wikipedia attribution link for picture from Syria-Turkey border by Kevorkmail, CCSA 3.0.

(Published: Friday, September 16, 2016 at 10:15 PM EDT)

DC Shorts: LGBTQ, including “Spoilers”, “Pink Boy”, “Seeking Jack Tripper”, and a documentary about Pat Haggerty

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DC Shorts, in its series “Tackling the Issue”, aired a sequence of six LGBT short films on Tuesday, Sept. 15.

The largest film was “Spoilers” (20 min), by Brendon McDonall   The film starts out when two slightly pudgy gay men meet on a plane when they both have identical carryon luggage.  They go back to Wales together, and the film moves into a kind of fantasy world, bordering on sci-fi (or maybe Tim Burton), perhaps reminding one of Judas Kiss or Dark Place, but not as convincing, because the characters, who have their tats, aren’t as charismatic.  I wondered, what happens to Wales if the UK splits up because of Brexit.

The documentary “These C*cksucking Tears” (16 minutes), by Dan Taherski, gives the life of the creator of the world’s only gay country-western album, Tennessee born Patrick Haggerty.  He describes his father as finally reluctantly accepting him and not wanting him to “sneak” through life.  We watch some vinyl records play on real turntables.  Country-western is a reasonably popular style in gay bars, like the Round Up in Dallas.

Pink Boy”, by Eric Rocky (15 minutes) shows a lesbian adoptive mom BJ bringing up Jeffrey, who wants to wear women’s clothes but isn’t clearly transgender, in redneck north Florida.  BJ says we all need to learn to take care of other people’s children.

Vessels”, by Arkasha Stevenson (15 min), shows a young transgender woman (after change) getting black market breast augmentation injections, on camera.

Seeking Jack Tripper”, by Quinlan O’Rear (14 minutes), present a married male couple, Tucker and Lance, visiting the Toolbox, and Upper East Side gay bar, deciding to try to seduce a third partner.  They finally pick someone with the right amount of chest hair and beard thickness and say so.  There’s a kissing scene in the John which I haven’t seen really happen in years in the bathroom – yet the scene had more potential.

Spunkle”, by Lisa Donato (11 min), shows two lesbians asking a friend to become “uncle” and supply sperm so they can procreate.  The friend is quite impressive visually; too bad it’s obvious that his chest is shaved.  The film takes the viewpoint that procreation is a moral imperative.

(Published: Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2016 at 10:45 PM)

DC Shorts tackles “Technology Addiction”: Top films are “Rated”, “Video”, and “Get the F__K out of Paris”

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Monday night, September 12, 2016, DC Shorts held one of its “Tackling the Issues” film sets, “Technology Addiction”.  It was shown at Landmark E Street cinema in one of the larger auditoriums, about half full.   In the QA the comment was offered that some films are not online yet because other festivals will not accept them if they can be found online (although DC Shorts will, and has an online festival).

The longest film was “Modern Love”, set in Montreal (bur in English) by director Nicolas Beachemin (20 min), with QA.   A blond, already furrowed 28-year-old connects with a young woman with a blind dating app.   Over time, various circumstances hinder their meeting (like her dropping her not life-proofed phone in soapy water).  But sometimes your love is closer to you geographically than you think.

The best film of the night is one of the next two.

Rated”, by John Forston (QA), 19 minutes,a delicious satire,  presents a typical San Fernando Valley family (played by Forston’s own wife and kids) where one morning every adult has a “YRLP” rating floating in the ether above their head, visible to all.  John’s wife got only 2-1/2 stars and finds herself discriminated against as a parent at a school meeting and the by a local restaurant, which will admit only those with 4-star ratings or more.   In the QA, Forston says he was inspired to make the film by the fact that Uber lets drivers rate consumers (as does Airbnb,  I think), which means that some consumers could find themselves cut out of the markets even as customers.  It’s obvious to draw a parallel in this film to past racial segregation.  But the idea could extend to excluding people from “life” for “cosmetic” reasons, like overweight, or having too much or too little body hair, or even something like “B.O.”.  The film could also be viewed as an extension of the idea of “online reputation”, which affects small businesses even more than people because of user reviews.

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Video”, by Randy Yang, appears to be shot in Washington DC, perhaps near Logan Circle.  A white woman, and young lawyer, berates a homeless black man selling stuff on the street.  (Actually, he really wasn’t panhandling.) Two young black women videotape her and threaten to post it on YouTube immediately (using the “Capture” app).  The threat that the video could go viral would threaten the white woman’s chance to make partner in the firm.  The two women try to blackmail her to get the video deleted.  There ensues some conversations about how white people perceive black people, especially women, visually.

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So Good the See You” annoys me as a greeting in social happy hours, and here it is a comedy (10 min) by Duke Merriman on not so radical hospitality.  A couple from Manhattan visits old friend Zoe at a party in Westchester, perhaps Scarsdale.  An overheard cell phone call ruins everything, leading to a confrontation reminding me of Roman Polanski’s “Carnage”, although the vomiting was kept off camera.

Get the F__k out of Paris”, by Greg Emetaz, presents a “Survival Mom’s” idea of impending apocalypse.  Doing laundry in a ritzy area near the Seine, a young woman gets a text message from a friend in the CIA that at midnight, every cell phone in Paris is going to explode.  What really happens at midnight?  The film has some structural concepts like the short story “The Ocelot the Way He Is” in my “Do Ask, Do Tell III” book. (treatment ).  The film also fortuitously (if accidentally) capitalizes on Samsung’s flammable Galaxy battery recall (WSJ story).

Syrah”, by Mike Holt (4 minutes) is a comic version of Siri, with a slightly middle Eastern flavor, albeit in the Bronx.  One of the characters looks like “Jaws” from the Hames Bond movies.

Life Smartphone” by Chenglin Xie, 3 min, China, animated, speculated what happens if everyone simply lives inside their own smartphones.  The animation resembles Danganronpa somewhat.

Still pictures: Volunteer activity at AATP “Meal Pack” Monday on Mall, and “Donald Trump”.

(Published: Tuesday, September 13, 2016 at 10:30 AM EDT)